Are Ungrounded Outlets Really Dangerous?

As local Indianapolis electricians, safety is a thing we talk about on our blog pretty often. Why? Well, for starters, electricity is, by nature, volatile. Sure, it’s been harnessed, but any amount of misuse can result in fires, property loss, and even fatalities. And secondly, misuse of electricity isn’t that uncommon. In fact, there is one very common problem we’re going to discuss today that you might just have lurking around your property: ungrounded electrical outlets.

What is an ungrounded outlet?

ungrounded outletsFor the most part, there are two types of electrical outlets: those with two slots, and those with two slots and a hole. In a standard home setup with safe ungrounded outlets, you’ll see these “three-prong configuration.” It’s that small hole on the bottom that is most important, because that’s what makes an outlet a “grounded” one.

The two vertical slots represent a “hot” wire and a “neutral” wire. The ground wire (the hole at the bottom) ties into the neutral vertical slot. When an outlet is grounded, it means that if something goes wrong with that outlet (say, an overload or current runs through the wrong channel), the grounding wire on the appliance would send that charge “to ground” or into the grounding wire. Without the ground wire, electricity would be allowed to travel wherever it could find a conductor (say, nearby drapes or even an unlucky person). However, thanks to the grounded outlet, this transient charge is sent harmlessly away with no troubles at all.

What are the dangers of an ungrounded outlet?

So how dangerous are we talking here? Should you stay awake at night worrying about stray electricity coming out from under your bed to get you? No. But should you be concerned enough to upgrade the outlets immediately? You bet. Not only are ungrounded electrical outlets not up to code, but they pose a few other major hazards.

Health hazards

Ungrounded outlets present a very real risk of shock to people who are using electronics and appliances plugged into the ungrounded outlet. This is especially important if the outlets are in rooms with running water, such as bathrooms and kitchens. (In this case, the outlets should be GFCI as well.)

Electrical fires

Without the ground present, any error that occurs with the outlet can allow electricity to travel outside the proper channel (called arcing), sparks, and electrical charges that can travel onto and ignite nearby material, such as carpet, furniture, or curtains. Typically, something homeowners want to avoid.

Property loss 

Ungrounded outlets can cause appliances and electrical equipment plugged into them to short out. Enough of this, and your favorite appliance or tool is now virtually useless.

Indication of other issues

In homes built before the 1960s, ungrounded outlets are very common. Also common during those decades were some other outdated electrical practices, such as knob-and-tube wiring. So, when you find ungrounded outlets, it is possible there are other electrical issues lurking behind the drywall as well.

Upgrading ungrounded electrical outlets in Indianapolis? Call White’s Electrical.

From an electrician’s perspective, upgrading ungrounded outlets is a very simple process, provided the wiring in your home is in good shape. It can often be done in a short amount of time and typically doesn’t rank high on a cost scale. Making electrical upgrades like this one can not only help get your home up to code and prevent electrical fire hazards, but it can increase your home’s resale value as well. Win-win-win!

For help identifying potential electrical issues, upgrading ungrounded outlets, or for a full electrical inspection, call the licensed electricians at White’s Electrical. We’ll get the job done quickly, efficiently, and most of all, safely. Send us a message or give us a call today to schedule an appointment!

Electrical Upgrades to Make Before Your Sell Your Home

electrical upgrades

Thinking of putting your home on the market soon? If your house has an outdated electrical system or other electrical problems, it won’t stand a chance against the competition. To be sure you’ll get top dollar for your home and your buyer will be getting a quality product, consider making some electrical upgrades before you list your home for sale.

How Do I Know If I Need to Make Electrical Upgrades in My Home?

There are a few telltale signs that your home’s electrical system has seen better days. Problems like these are likely to be found during a home inspection prior to the sale. For a buyer, the discovery of these issues may cast doubt that the home has been properly cared for in other ways as well. Making these improvements before you list your home can help make sure the sale goes smoothly.

In many cases, just having a few basic improvements taken care of before your list your home can make a huge difference for a buyer who doesn’t want to deal with the hassle themselves. While many of these upgrades are subtle and wouldn’t be immediately noticed by the buyer, an inspector would certainly take note of them.

A few of these basic, yet important, improvements that could be easily addressed by a licensed electrician are the following:

• A humming or buzzing sound is coming from your circuits.
• Outlets spark or are hot to the touch.
• The same circuit breaker switch keeps flipping.
• Your lights flicker or get dimmer and brighter sporadically.
• The outlets are the older, two-prong style.
Lightbulbs in the same fixture keep blowing.
• Your home was built with aluminum wiring.
• Your home does not offer at least 200-amp service.

In addition, there are a few other upgrades you might choose to make for the sake of curb appeal or convenience.

• Add outlets indoors and outdoors.
• Upgrade light fixtures.
• Add patio or security lighting outdoors.
• Upgrade dimmer switches to support LED bulbs.
• Upgrade light switches to a more modern design.

Having a licensed electrician complete an electrical inspection before you list your home can give you a good idea of where to start with your improvements. In fact, most electricians will be able to prioritize the improvements, give you an estimate to have them completed, and even handle some of the necessary tasks during the inspection.

Schedule a Home Electrical Inspection with White’s Electrical.

By far, the best way to know if your home is meeting today’s electrical standards is to schedule an electrical inspection by a licensed professional from White’s Electrical. We’ll give you and honest assessment of your electrical upgrade needs.

Not only will making these upgrades make your home easier to sell, but they’ll make your time living in your home safer and more functional as well! Give us a call today or follow this link to schedule your inspection.

Why Your Dimmer Switch is Buzzing, And Answers to You Other Dimmer Switch Questions

dimmer switch is buzzing

It only takes one power outage to remind us how important lighting is to a room. It can dictate your ability to complete certain tasks, set the tone of the room, and even affect your mood.

Lighting has the ability to completely change the look and feel of the entire room. Installing dimmer switches is a great way to change up your existing lighting, and thus change the functionality of the room. However, like anything in your home, if the dimmer switches aren’t functioning properly it can be annoying or even concerning. Sometimes, homeowners notice that their dimmer switch is buzzing or humming, the lights are flickering, or they aren’t dimming properly. Here are answers to the most common questions about dimmer switches.

The Problem: The dimmer switch is buzzing or humming.

The Solution: Update your dimmer rating.

When humming or buzzing is coming from the dimmer itself, that may be a sign of an overload. This means that the circuit connected to the dimmer switch is attempting to handle too much power. If there are several bulbs in the fixture, removing some of them is an easy way to troubleshoot and reduce the potential overload. If you remove the bulbs and the buzzing stops, that means that it’s time for an upgrade. Call a local licensed electrician to help you find the proper replacement for this dimmer switch.

The Problem: The light fixture connected to a dimmer switch is buzzing or humming.

The Solution: Change the bulbs.

Most often, buzzing coming from the fixture itself is usually related to the type of lightbulb you’re using. You might just need to replace the existing lightbulbs with new bulbs that have a shorter filament or lower wattage. Also, most older dimmer switches are not rated for use with LED bulbs, so be sure to pair the right bulb with your dimmer switch. CFL bulbs can also cause problems with your dimmer, so if you insist on using CFLs, make sure they’re rated as dimmable and your dimmer switch can pair with them.

The Problem: The dimmer switch is making the lights pop on, cut out, or flicker.

The Solution: Change the bulbs.

Not all bulbs are dimmable, so make sure the ones in your fixture are. Like we mentioned above, not all types of bulbs are compatible with all dimmer switches. For example, some dimmer switches do not work properly when a LED bulb is installed. If your dimmer switch isn’t dimming the lights properly, chances are that the switch and the bulbs just aren’t meant to be friends.

The Problem: The dimmer switch is hot to the touch.

The Solution: Upgrade the dimmer switch.

It can be normal for a dimmer switch to be a little warm when it is on, however if the switch is hot to the touch, it is likely that it is overloaded. There are a couple solutions that could remedy this. First, you could upgrade the dimmer switch. Some dimmer switches are rated to handle 1000-1500 watts. This is usually the simplest solution. Secondly, you could try switching out the bulbs to LEDs or CFLs which us less energy than incandescent. However, if you go this route just remember that not all dimmer switches play well with all types of bulbs, even if the bulbs are dimmable. Lastly, you could rewire the lights. Especially if the dimmer switch controls several fixtures (say, track lighting), splitting up the lights on two different dimmer switches would solve the problem. This solution requires the help of a licensed electrician.

Need Help?

Dimmer switches are a great way to set the ambiance in a room, or just save on your energy bill. If your dimmer switches aren’t behaving properly, give us a call – we can help!

Four Reasons to Become an Electrician

reasons to become an electrician

Thinking about working toward a new career? Maybe you’re bored at your desk job or feel unfilled in your current career. Or maybe you’re getting ready to graduate high school and aren’t sure what you want to do.

If these scenarios sound familiar, consider becoming an electrician. Here are four reasons to become an electrician.

1. You’ll work in a respected field.

Electricians perform highly technical work and that work requires skill and attention to detail. Even the most avid DIYer usually hires a professional to complete their electrical work. Homeowners know that working with electricity can be dangerous, so they rely on trained professionals to safely and accurately complete these complicated tasks.

In addition, nearly every new construction project requires the expertise of an electrician at some point in the construction process. Other construction professionals trust and respect the electricians they work with.

2. You’ll make good money and have advancement opportunities.

Electricians have some of the highest salaries among trade professionals in the construction industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median rate of pay in 2017 was $54,110 per year, with the most experienced electricians earning $88,130 a year.

After your training and apprenticeship are completed, you’ll not only gain respect in the field, but have opportunities to advance and earn more money. With proper training as an apprentice, you can become a journeyman electrician. As a journeyman electrician, you can work on your own to install wiring and repair intricate electrical problems.

With experience and additional training, you can progress to become a master electrician. A master electrician can design and install full wiring systems, as well as manage other electricians.

3. You’ll learn specialized skills.

People respect electricians because they have specialized knowledge and a specific skillset that most people don’t have. Electrical work often requires both physical labor and intelligent problem solving. Electricians need to be able to solve complex issues that require critical thinking and attention to detail.

As an electrician, you will likely face new problems every day. One day, you might be wiring a new home, and the next you could be replacing an electrical panel at a large warehouse. You could be working outdoors or in nearly any type of facility. If you enjoy working with your hands, problem-solving, and meeting new people, you can play to those strengths in this job field.

4. There is a growing demand for skilled trades like electricians.

Over the next 10 years, the BLS estimates that job opportunities for electricians are expected to grow by 9%.

This growing demand for electricians occurs in part because of the consistent need for electrical services in homes and buildings everywhere. This also offers tremendous job security for those in the electrical field. Modern society depends on electricity, and new technology emerges regularly. Homeowners and business owners rely on the skills of an electrician to help maintain their standard of living.

Another reason for this growing demand is in part because many long-time electricians will be retiring in the next decade. Many electricians in the baby boomer generation have begun to retire, and leave their jobs open to the next generation of skilled professionals.

Why is There Power in Only Half of My House?

Circuit Breaker - White's Electrical - Indianapolis, Indiana

We probably all know the frustration of a power outage. It’s a pretty common household annoyance, especially if you live in a rural area or an area with extreme weather, like much of Indiana.

Sometimes power can go out in the whole house, only one outlet, or only one room. Here’s what to do in each circumstance.

Power Out in Whole House

Most of the time, if the power is out in the whole house, it is probably a power outage due to downed power lines, weather, or infrastructure. Unless you have access to a generator or other backup power, all you can really do is break out the flashlights and wait until power is restored.

Occasionally if the power is out in your whole home, your breaker needs to be reset. If all of your neighbors have power, this is probably the case. If this is your situation, you may have a tripped breaker. To reset the main breaker in your home, go to the circuit breaker and flip all the breakers off. Turn the main breaker switch on and off several times, finishing in the “on” position. Then reset each of the breakers, one at a time. If power is restored, you are all set! If not, or if it causes the main breaker to trip, you have a problem with a circuit and need to call a licensed electrician for a repair.

Power Out in Only One Outlet

GFCI - Two Prong Outlets - White's Electrical - IndianapolisIf power is out in only outlet, you might have a tripped GFCI. This is just a variation of a tripped breaker. Many circuits in a home (especially bathrooms and kitchens) have GFCI (or ground fault circuit interrupter) outlets. GFCIs detect when current is flowing along an unintended path (like water or a person) and cut the power to that circuit until the GFCI is reset.

To reset this circuit, you just have to push the reset button and power should be restored. If it immediately trips again, you probably have too many things plugged into the same circuit. Unplug some things and try it again. If this doesn’t work, you need to have an electrician come take a look.

If the outlet without power isn’t a GFCI (doesn’t have a reset button on it), you might have a tripped breaker. In your circuit breaker box, check to see if one of the breakers is flipped. If so, make sure it is turned fully to the “off” position, and firmly turn it back to the “on” position. If this doesn’t restore power or if it immediately trips again, call an electrician.

Power Out in Only One Room

If the power is out in only one room, you probably have a tripped breaker. Like we said above, you can fix this by looking for a breaker switch in your circuit breaker box that is off or partially off. Turn it completely off, then switch it back to the on position. It should reset the part of the house without power. If it trips again, there is likely something attached to that breaker that is shorting out. In rarer cases, a breaker can be bad, but this is not as common.

Breakers Keep Tripping

If resetting breakers doesn’t help restore power, or if the same breaker keeps tripping, you probably need to call a local electrician for help. White’s Electrical is a team of licensed electricians with the tools, experience, and training to help diagnose and fix your electrical problems to your home quickly and safely.

What to Do if Your Circuit Breaker Won’t Reset

circuit breaker won't reset

 

One of the most common problems within a home’s electrical system is that of a tripped circuit breaker. You’ve probably experienced it a number of times yourself. Usually, the fix is a simple flip of a switch, and the lights are back on. But occasionally, the circuit breaker won’t reset or keeps tripping. So, what can you do if your circuit breaker won’t reset?

1. Be sure you are resetting the breaker properly.

First of all, be sure that you are taking the proper steps to reset the breaker. It sounds silly, but make sure you’re flipping the right switch. Also, be sure that you’re pushing the breaker handle firmly and fully to the off position, and then back to the on position.

2. Check for evidence of an overloaded circuit.

Signs of an overloaded circuit can look something like this: a circuit breaker trips, won’t reset immediately, resets after a cool-down period, and then trips again after a few minutes. The cause of an overloaded circuit is usually just that there are too many heavy loads plugged into receptacles or outlets on the same circuit, or that there is a faulty appliance plugged into the circuit that is causing the problem. Overloaded circuits are common in older kitchens and bathrooms where there are often several appliances plugged into the same circuit.

To troubleshoot the cause, unplug everything and reset the breaker. If it stays reset, plug in everything one by one, until a problem becomes evident.

3. Check for a short circuit.

If the circuit breaker won’t reset and trips immediately, the problem might be a short circuit. A short circuit occurs when a hot wire carrying a current touches a neutral wire. In this case, the flipped breaker is a safety mechanism and is evidence of your circuit breaker working properly. A short circuit can cause broken appliances, overheating, or even be a fire hazard. If you suspect a short circuit is the reason your circuit breaker keeps tripping, leave the breaker off and call a licensed electrician.

4. Check for a faulty breaker.

Although it is much less likely, it is possible that the breaker itself is faulty. If this is the case, you definitely need to call a licensed electrician for help.

5. Call an electrician for help.

Whether you are inexperienced, uninterested, or just too busy to find the underlying cause of why your circuit breaker won’t reset, a phone call to a licensed electrician at White’s Electrical can’t hurt. At White’s Electrical, we have the experience, knowledge, and tools to find and fix the problem for good.

Connect with us on Facebook, submit this online contact form, or give us a call today at (317)834-1922.

Benefits of Landscape Lighting

landscape lighting

When the weather warms up, most of us like to get outside and take advantage of the longer daylight hours. But the appeal of summer doesn’t stop when it gets dark. No matter our reasons for wanting to be outside after dark, having the option to fully illuminate our surroundings can have some big benefits.

Safety

Well-lit paths can help prevent tripping or other accidents. Lighting walkways, stairs, or any other potentially hazardous area can help you navigate safely around the property. In addition, having dark areas illuminated can help give peace of mind for someone who may become easily frightened in the dark.

Security

Unwanted intruders are much less likely to attempt an intrusion into a well-lit area. Use landscape lighting to illuminate the perimeter of your home, especially entry points. Although lights cannot prevent crime, statistics show that a well-lit home is much more likely to deter criminals.
Motion-tripped floodlights are a great way to protect your home and save energy at the same time. They only turn on when they sense motion instead of remaining on all night long.

Ambiance and Entertainment

The right landscape lighting can help set the perfect atmosphere for your party. Illuminate pools, patios, decks, and any space where you guests will be. You might even say that landscape lighting will make your summer parties “lit.”

Functionality

Even if you aren’t entertaining guests, just enjoying your backyard alone is much easier with the right lighting. Landscape lighting can allow you to use your pool or spa, outdoor kitchen or grill, or patio after dark.

Added Value

The right lighting can make your home stand out from the rest. Professionally placed landscape lighting can be used to revel subtle contours, shapes, and textures of your home and property. This can add value to your home and increase its curb appeal. Landscape lighting can be used to accentuate architecture and the charm of your home.

Why should I work with White’s Electrical for my landscape lighting?

White’s Electrical can help you increase the security, safety, ambiance, function, and value of your home by adding landscape lighting. Our design team will walk you through the process and work with you to make your vision come to life. Our licensed electricians can provide the exceptional service and professionalism you have been looking for. Connect with us on Facebook, submit this online contact form, or give us a call to schedule a consultation today!

GFCIs vs Circuit Breakers

You probably have two types of outlets in your home: one type with only holes or slots, and one type with holes and buttons. Those with no buttons are regular outlets and those with buttons are GFCIs. Both types can shut off the electricity flowing through them, but in different ways and for different reasons. Knowing which type you have and which type you need can help keep you and your home safe. Here’s what you need to know when it comes to comparing GFCIs vs circuit breakers.

What is a circuit breaker?

Most people are familiar with a tripped circuit in their circuit breaker box. A circuit breaker is designed to stop the flow of electricity (break an electrical current) when there is a current overload. Regular outlets (those without a button) are connected to the breaker box.

An overloaded circuit means that too many power-consuming devices are being run at the same time on the same circuit. For example, if you have a 15-amp circuit with 20 amps worth of electricity running through it, the circuit breaker will trip to prevent overheating. When a circuit trips, a switch in the breaker box is “flipped,” and needs to be manually switched back to its previous position to turn it back on.

A circuit breaker is a way to prevent too much electricity from flowing through one circuit. Thus, it is able to prevent overheating the circuit and prevent fire hazards.

What is a GFCI?

Simply put, a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) is a way to protect people from electrical shock. The GFCI will turn off (interrupt) the circuit when there is a current leak (as opposed to a current overload like a circuit breaker).

If you look at a normal 120-volt outlet in the United States, you’ll see two vertical slots with a round hole centered below them. The right slot is slightly smaller than the left. The right slot is called “hot,” the left slot is called “neutral,” and the hole below them is called “ground.”

If an appliance is working properly, all electricity used by that appliance will flow from hot to neutral.  A GFCI monitors the amount of current flowing from hot to neutral, and if there is any imbalance, it trips the circuit. If the GFCI senses that there is a mismatch of power even as small as four or five milliamps, it can react as quickly as one-thirtieth of a second. So, if power is flowing through anything other than the circuit (say, a human body), the circuit is tripped almost immediately.

Do I need a GFCI or a regular outlet?

Besides the fact that you are required by law to install GFCI outlets in certain areas, they are generally considered to be safer and a better investment. They can help prevent electrical-related injuries, electrical fires, and appliance damage. Additionally, circuit breaker GFCIs are often used as replacements for standard circuit breakers and provide GFCI protection for all outlets on that circuit.

White’s Electrical is a team of local licensed electricians who are up to speed on building codes. This not only keeps us safe, but it keeps our customers safe as well. If you need a new outlet installed, GFCI or otherwise, give us a call.

How Much Does It Cost to Replace Old Electrical Wiring?

cost to replace old electrical wiring

Individuals tend not to think about the cost to replace old electrical wiring running through their building. They tend not to think about the wiring at all. Every time they flip a switch or turn on an appliance, they’re thinking about their job, not electricity. But it’s good to consider the building’s electrical system from time to time because if it’s old or is damage, it can cause problems. Electrical fires, for instance, are a consequence of degraded wiring, and they occur too often.

Recently, vacant house in Lebanon, Indiana, caught fire because of bad electrical wiring. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 20 minutes, the flames did an estimated $30,000 in property damage.

Replacing wiring can be an expensive investment, but it’s important that you be able to identify old and damaged electrical wiring before serious damage or harm comes to your building.

Signs of Bad Electrical Wiring

Frayed Wires

Wires become frayed from age, wear and tear, heat, and corrosion. Damaged wire casing (the plastic covering) exposes the wires, which, when live, can ignite fires and puts people at risk of shock or electrocution.

Bad Outlets

Every year, 4,000 people are treated for electrical injuries. Bad outlets are one such cause. According to the National Fire Protection Association, discolored outlets (which turn colors when poorly wired circuitry heats up) — conduct electricity, meaning they can carry an electric current. If you notice an outlet turning colors, immediately call an electrician.

There are other indicators of an electrical problem with an outlet. Sizzling noises, popping sounds, and the smell burnt plastic all indicate that you should contact an electrician.

Tripped Circuit Breakers

Circuit breakers are the main distribution source of electrical circuits in a building. They provide power to all appliances and protect wiring from a becoming overloaded. When the breaker “trips” — when it shuts off the power — it’s protecting the circuit from overheating and causing damage.

If you must constantly reset your circuit breaker, it’s a sign circuits are overloaded and that a professional should asses them.

Costs of Upgrading Electrical Wiring

If you have electrical wiring that is isn’t functioning well or is damaged, it’s time to consider replacing it. Costs for upgrading electrical wiring  depend on a number of factors:

  • The price of the electrical wires
  • The cost of other materials including panels
  • The price of your electrician’s hourly rate

According to Home Advisor, new wires typically range from $6 to $8 per foot. Breaker boxes (also called electrical panels), if required, are priced separately. These appliances vary in price depending on what your budget and building necessitate. The average cost of breaker boxes by amperage are:

  • 100 amp: $800 to $2,500
  • 200 amp: $1,300 to $3,000
  • 400 amp: $2,000 to $4,000

Home Advisor also lists average labor costs for electrical jobs. In Indianapolis, Indiana, the average labor cost for basic home wiring ranges from $3,330.87 to $4,037.42. The supplies for such a job average between $1,322.31 to $1,504.22. Prices will vary depending on location and exact job parameters, of course. Ultimately, you will have to ask a licensed electrician for a quote to learn the cost.

Choosing Safety: OSHA Workplace Standards

Electricity mobilizes almost all aspects of modern life, both at home and on the job. Of course we’re familiar with it – comfortable even. However, it can post serious hazard in the workplace, especially for engineers, electricians, and power line works who work directly with it. Direct contact with electricity can result in shock, electrocution, and burns. And when electricity escapes its circuitry, it can cause fires and explosions.

It’s because of these dangers that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)  was established in the ’60s to ensure and safe working conditions in the workplace. OSHA sets safety regulations and provides training, outreach, education, and assistance so workers can enforce its standards to protect themselves and their surroundings.

OSHA workplace standards

Health and Safety Standards

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, OSHA controls health and safety regulations. These regulations limit hazardous chemical exposure and employee access to classified information. They require the use of protective equipment and cautionary measures in case of accidents around dangerous machinery as well.

In order to guide employers and employees in avoiding hazards and developing effective plans, OSHA publishes “Safety and Health Program Management Guidelines”. The guidelines identify several crucial elements needed for a successful safety system:

  • Management leadership
  • Employee involvement
  • Worksite Analysis
  • Hazard prevention and control
  • Safety and health training

The main goal of the guidelines is to provide employers, workers, and representatives with a flexible safety format which employers can adapt to any workspace. The adaptability allows companies of all sizes to use the programs to make changes where they’re needed.

The guidelines detail a proactive, inclusive plan to prevent hazardous conditions. Employers collect information about the known hazards beforehand, periodically inspect the workplace, and investigate all accidents, injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. OSHA pushes companies — employees and employers alike — to communicate trends or problems seen in order to prevent injuries.

Specifically, OSHA suggests employers take the following steps to create a safe environment:

  • Create a list of hazards in order from most to least important
  • Assign a trustworthy individual to implement controls on specific machines which require a steady hand
  • Establish a goal end date to have all new regulations and tasks completed
  • Track their company’s progress via charts, regular inspections, and employee reports

Responsibilities Under OSHA

OSHA regulations of course also list things every employer must do to ensure their workers remain safe, however. For example, employers must:

  • Provide safety training to workers in cohesive languages
  • Perform tests in the workplace, such as air sampling
  • Display the official OSHA Job Safety and Health Law poster
  • Provide personal protective equipment
  • Notify OSHA within eight hours of a workplace fatality

Why OSHA Standards are Important to Our Relationship with Clients

When you choose White’s Electrical as your electrician, you’re choosing a professional company who is proud to adhere to OSHA standards. We take safety very seriously, and are constantly reassessing our own safety practices to ensure the safety of both our employees and clients. Our licensed electricians are highly trained, skilled, and ready to take on any job – safely.